• Jakub Stepaniuk

Who is cursed nowadays? Historical lessons from Poland


Polish boy carrying the logo of the ruling PiS party at a demonstration (source: http://publici.ucimc.org/2018/12/democratic-backsliding-in-eastern-europe/)

Polish boy carrying the logo of the ruling PiS party at a demonstration (source: http://publici.ucimc.org/2018/12/democratic-backsliding-in-eastern-europe/)

It is quite hard to imagine somebody who having at least minimum contact with the surrounding reality of international politics hasn’t heard yet about the Law and Justice government’s (or PiS in its Polish abbreviation) achievements. From time to time headlines plangently howl about the demolition of democracy, the rise of fascism, violations of women’s rights. All of these are neatly arranged under a colourful “populism” tag, which recently became one of the main points of one’s morning agenda; making a daily cup of coffee a way more fascinating experience. Kaczyński, together with Orbán and occasional performances of Erdoğan, Salvini or Putin, resemble nowadays a flamboyant punk band shocking from time to time the liberal audience of Western Europe which clicks the "populism" tag as often as it gets tired of Brexit or yellow vests.

Any student of political theory would probably get lost in his or her research while struggling to classify PiS’s policies under any specific ideological concept. Even pages from an absolute classic of any political degree, Heywood's Political Ideologies, seem to be as useful as notes of the T